Saturday, April 08, 2006

Throsby Park House


This morning I was doing one of the things I love best - touring a historical house!
We don't have that many in Australia, so when one has an open day I like to be there. In this case the house was local, just up the road from where I live. Now see, I live in the southern highlands because of it's history aspect and that it is a very beautiful area. It's the closest I can get to Victorian history without living in England!

Throsby Park House was built in 1834 by one of the first land owners that settled in the Highlands. The original land grant was given to Charles Throsby in recognition of his exploration of the area in the 1820s.
The main house is a lovely Georgian colonial style, wide verandahs, etc. Sadly, it needs a lot more money spent on it than what has been spent so far. Lands & Parks have limited funds for it. It breaks my heart. I really wish the government would step in and take over these old homes and do them up. Once these houses are gone there is no replacing them! When will authorities wake up to this problem?
Anyway, it was wonderful to look around the house. The ceiling were so high, and the servants stairs so narrow and near vertical, poor beggers.

As a historical author my head was just buzzing with ideas as I toured the rooms.
I can't help myself and I have to touch the walls and think of the people who, 170 years ago, built them.
Heaven.
So, that's my brush with history for a little while until Septemeber when I'll visit Camden Park House, built by John Macarthur in 1834 and still in family hands to this day. The family have a small hill some distance from the house and that's where all members of the Macarthur family are buried. It's amazing. The house grounds have the oldest Camelia in Australia, planted by Elizabeth Macarthur from a sapling brought from England. It's a beautiful home.

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